A Guide to Baking with Cannabis

A Guide to Baking with Cannabis

Cooking with cannabis does not start in your kitchen. It doesn’t start in your flowerpot or grow room. It starts with some study. For one thing, your cannabis is an expensive ingredient, so waste is not your culinary friend. For another, if cannabis is still illegal in your area, you should exercise some discretion.

So, this guide is going to start earlier than the recipe preparation with your “needs to know:”

1.  What do you want out of your edibles? If you value buzz over therapy, you must select a cannabis strain that will benefit you. The heating process will convert the THCA into THC, and too much processing and cooking can destroy it. If you want the comfort and relaxation of CBD, you need a potency that cooking will not reduce too much.

2.  Do you know what strain to buy? If you decide on the THC: CBD ratio you want, you don’t need the most expensive strain that fits that profile. Cooking will deconstruct the cannabis, so you don’t need the top dollar strain.

3.  Do you want the freshest plant? You always want to buy fresh, but you will decarboxylate the cannabis so you will be drying the freshness right out it. You can still use the buds for smoking or other use because you can get what you want from the trim, kief, and debris.

4.  Do you know where to get help? There are hundreds of recipes online, but your dispensary budtender should be able to advise you on selection and process.

5.  What do I need? Most recipes call for cannabutter or cannabis-infused oil, so you need the kitchen tools and appliances to help. Once you make them, you can store them for use in making edibles with ordinary kitchen supplies.

6.  Where do I start? You are going to cook in your kitchen. It should be clean and contamination-free. You should remove other foods and tools to avoid the transfer of cannabis dust. You must avoid risk to any children in the house.

7.  How do I make cannabutter?  Cannabutter will have the texture of dairy butter and will be used in much the same way butter is used in recipes. You start with 0.05-cups of lightly-salted butter over low heat in a saucepan. Stirring the melting butter over low heat, you add finely ground cannabis buds.

A Guide to Baking with Cannabis

A simple recipe requires 0.25-ounces of ground buds, but if you want medical use, you would double the cannabis amount per pound. After stirring the combination for 45-minutes with a wooden spoon, you strain the mixture into a glass bowl, pressing it lightly through the strainer lined with cheesecloth.

You can use the cannabutter immediately. You should refrigerate it well back on its shelf to keep it cold. Or, you can brew enough to divide into batches freezing them like butter sticks or in ice cube trays for easy use on pasta or in other recipes. If you use additional dairy butter for larger batches, you must simmer the mixture longer.

We put some of our butter mixture into ice cube trays for freezing. We can, then, pop one or two cubes to melt over linguini or ravioli or we spread it on good bread or whole grain biscuits and bagels. The cubes work well for any recipe requiring an ounce or two of butter.

8. How can I make canna oil? There are dozens of recipes, many oils with different tastes and textures, and several processes to making cannabis-infused oils. Coconut oils are sweeter, olive oil lighter, and canola oils healthier. But, if you want to keep it simple, you will use 0.50-ounces of potent cannabis to every 1.25-cups of oil. You will add water to keep the liquid from reaching a boiling point.

To keep it simple, you would cook the oil on a stove top in a Dutch oven. Mix the oil with ground, decarboxylated, and dried cannabis in the upper half of a double boiler with enough distilled water to reach three-inches in depth.

You must keep the mixture simmering in the lidded pot for two to four hours, stirring regularly and adding water as necessary. If you prefer to use a slow cooker, you can reduce watching your pot, but it will take longer.

When ready, you strain the mixture as you did the cannabutter. Oil will always rise to the top so the sediment will settle. You can repeat the straining process to reduce the amount of plant material remaining.

9. Where do I go from here? With cannabutter and cannabis oil in your pantry, you have two key ingredients for cooking just about anything. You would use them in recipes calling

Use your cannabutter immediately or refrigerate or freeze until it is time to use. You can easily scale this recipe up for larger batches of cannabutter. One pound of butter (4 sticks) can absorb 1 ounce of cannabis, but you may want to simmer for up to 60 minutes.

10.  How do you dose? Dosing edibles is crucial. Whether you’re planning brownies, candies, or cake, you must plan on distributing the cannabis content. You cannot risk dosing a single brownie with ten times the recommended dosage.

Hempster offers a handy calculator that helps you distribute the amount of a known THC content in individual recipes. If, for example, you prefer to serve edibles with 5mg THC each, you take three grams of ground cannabis and divide it by the recipe yield. 300mg THC would divide into 5mg per cookie in a recipe yielding 60.

However, you must develop a knack for determining how much cannabutter or canna-oil provide that 300mg THC. It makes sense, therefore, to stick to recipes prepared by canna chefs rather than trying to adapt your grandmother’s recipe for brownies.

The History of Cooking with Cannabis

Edibles have a longer history than you may think. While recipes for edible pastries and other assorted foodstuffs have circulated in the underground of American culture for over a century, there is evidence of people cooking with cannabis dating as far back as 10th century India. In this region of the world, it is still common to encounter a mixture of finely-ground marijuana and other smoothie ingredients known as “bhang”. While it is unknown whether the two concoctions are related, recipes for a similar beverage have been discovered in Italy from the Renaissance period.

In America, cannabis was mostly considered a “tonic” or medicine until the 20th century. It was not until the 60s that the cannabis culture we currently recognize, with its assorted cookies, magic brownies, cupcakes, lollipops, and much more arose with a loosening of social restrictions, even as regulations intensified.

With recreational legalization on the horizon, the future of edible creations looks brighter than ever. Amazing, creative companies aim to create new, exciting products and push the limits of what consumers believe is possible when it comes to edible products.

Why Cook With Cannabis?

There are many benefits to cooking with cannabis that might not be apparent at first thought. Beyond the joy of performing a task yourself, there are other, more practical reasons why one might consider diving into a recipe instead of purchasing an edible at a store.

While many edible companies offer outstanding quality, the task of purchasing edibles in America isn’t always easy. New regulations are relieving some of the pain of dishonest merchants, but not every edible can be trusted to remain true to its packaging. It’s still recommended that consumers do as much research as possible before making a purchase.

Cooking with cannabis offers the individual more control over their edible experience. To begin with, you know exactly how much and what kind of flower is being used. That means you are free to make your edible experience as potent or as newbie-friendly as you’d like.

Introduction to edibles and baking with cannabis

What are edibles?

Cannabis edibles are any food that is infused with cannabis compounds like THC and CBD.

A great option for those who don’t want to smoke cannabis but still enjoy it, edibles vary in both form and potency: chocolates, brownies, cookies, gummies, tea, hot sauce, and much more. You can pretty much turn anything into an edible and make it as potent or weak as you like.

How do you cook or bake edibles?

The edible cooking and baking process starts with decarboxylation (de-carb-ox-yl-a-tion). Basically, you need to heat cannabis in order for your body to absorb cannabinoids, like THC and CBD. When you smoke weed, this happens from the flame of your lighter.

When you make edibles, you still have to heat weed to decarboxylate it to make THC readily available for your body. But you do it at a much lower temperature so that the plant stays intact while you infuse it with butter or oil, or whatever your base ingredient for cooking or baking is.

Introduction to edibles and baking with cannabis

What are edibles?

Cannabis edibles are any food that is infused with cannabis compounds like THC and CBD.

A great option for those who don’t want to smoke cannabis but still enjoy it, edibles vary in both form and potency: chocolates, brownies, cookies, gummies, tea, hot sauce, and much more. You can pretty much turn anything into an edible and make it as potent or weak as you like.

How do you cook or bake edibles?

The edible cooking and baking process starts with decarboxylation (de-carb-ox-yl-a-tion). Basically, you need to heat cannabis in order for your body to absorb cannabinoids, like THC and CBD. When you smoke weed, this happens from the flame of your lighter.RelatedWhat is decarboxylation, and why does your cannabis need it?

When you make edibles, you still have to heat weed to decarboxylate it to make THC readily available for your body. But you do it at a much lower temperature so that the plant stays intact while you infuse it with butter or oil, or whatever your base ingredient for cooking or baking is.

But that’s not to say you can’t eat a stale cookie—it might not taste that great, but it will still get you high. Some amount of THC will typically be in there for up to six months; the main concern is the baked good going bad or getting moldy.

Always, always, keep cannabis edibles out of reach of children, and consider labeling your infused goodies to avoid confusing unsuspecting housemates. We’ve all heard the story of the housemate who came home and helped themself to a fresh brownie, not knowing they were infused with weed…

A Guide to Baking with Cannabis

How do you measure edible dosage for baking?

We highly recommend you start with a small amount of cannabis when making infused butter, oil, or anything else.

Most of our recipes below call for equal parts baking ingredient to cannabis—for example, 1 cup butter to 1 cup ground cannabis—but if this is your first time infusing weed, use even less. The worst that can happen is the edible won’t be as strong as you hoped.

Pro tip: Write down the ratio of cannabis to cooking ingredient you use, so that you can copy or adjust the recipe next time. You may think you’ll remember how much you put in, but after a couple edibles it’s easy to forget.

What kind of equipment do I need to bake edibles?

Baking edibles is easy. All you need is an oven and whatever utensils you’d use for regular baking—a mixing bowl, spoon, measuring cups, and maybe a whisk, depending on the recipe.

Oh, and some weed. Generally about 7-10 grams, or two eighths.

Will my neighbors be able to smell the edibles I’m baking?

Not at all. It might smell a little bit, but the smell won’t leave the kitchen.

Making cannabutter or cannabis oil can be a smelly process because you generally heat weed for a few hours, but even then, the neighbors won’t be able to tell.

Cannabis butter and cannabis cooking oil recipes

Every good edible starts with a base weed-infused ingredient. THC and CBD are fat-soluble, meaning they need fats to dissolve and for your body to use them.

Because a lot of baking involves butter, most people infuse that with cannabis, but cooking oil, coconut oil, and honey are other fat-soluble favorites you can infuse with cannabis and then make edibles with.

Making cannabutter is easy, but it can take some time. You can cook weed butter when you’re hanging around the house for a few hours, or overnight if you have a slow cooker—just make sure you don’t leave the house with your infusion cooking on the stovetop unattended.

All you need to whip up a batch of cannabutter is butter, water, marijuana, cheesecloth, and a stovetop or slow cooker. After it’s done, you can use the cannabutter as you would regular butter in any baking recipe. You can even make flavored cannabutter, dressing up our basic recipe by adding additional ingredients like honey and lavender, roasted garlic and chives, roasted jalapeño and cilantro-lime, raspberry jam, or other delicious combinations.

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